Professionals

Professionals

All of DCI’s consultants have advanced degrees in Industrial/ Organizational (I/O) Psychology.  I/O psychologists are uniquely qualified to understand the intersection of work and human behavior because they are trained to evaluate employment decision-making, work performance, and organizational behavior. In addition, each consultant has a firm understanding of statistics, psychometrics, affirmative action plan regulations, and compensation analysis.

Mike Aamodt  
 
Michael Aamodt, Ph.D

Principal Consultant

Eric Dunleavy  
 
Eric Dunleavy, Ph.D

Director of Personnel Selection and Litigation Support Services

Harold M Busch  
 
Harold M. Busch, Ed.M.

Vice President of
Government Affairs

Fred Satterwhite  
 
Fred Satterwhite, M.S., M.A.

Principal Consultant

 
 
Keli Wilson, M.A.

Principal Consultant

Joanna Colosimo  
 
Joanna Colosimo, M.A.

Senior Consultant

Amanda Shapiro  
 
Amanda Shapiro, M.S.

Senior Consultant

 
 
Jerilyn J. Kinderdine

Director of Administration

Kayo Sady  
 
Kayo G. Sady, Ph.D.

Senior Consultant

 
 
Emilee B. Tison, Ph.D.

Senior Consultant

 
 
Samantha Holland, Ph.D.

Consultant

Jana Garman  
 
Jana Garman, M.A.

Consultant

Yevonessa Hall  
 
Yevonessa Hall, M.P.S.

Consultant

 
 
David Sharrer, M.S.

Consultant

Kristen Pryor  
 
Kristen Pryor, M.S.

Consultant

Yesenia Avila  
 
Yesenia Avila, M.P.S.

Associate Consultant

 
 
Rachel Gabbard, M.A.

Associate Consultant

 
 
Jeff Henderson, M.P.S.

Associate Consultant

 
 
Brittany Dian, M.S.

Associate Consultant

 
 
Vinaya Sakpal, M.P.S.

HR Analyst

 
 
Bryce Hansell, M.A.

HR Analyst

 
 
Cecilia Liu, M.A.

Accountant

 
 
Steven Huang, M.S.

Computer Programmer

 
 
Christina Georgia

Administrative Coordinator

News

Obama targets gender pay gap with plan to collect companies’ salary data

In a Washington Post article on Friday, January 29th, 2016, David Cohen discusses the EEOC’s proposed Equal Pay Report.

Recent Blog Posts

Practical versus Statistical Significance

In our previous blog on the topic of statistical significance, we discussed how to interpret the meaning of “statistically significant.”  In this blog, we want to expand on the topic by discussing the difference between statistical and practical significance.

As mentioned in the previous blog, when a group difference is statistically significant, it only indicates that it is unlikely, but not impossible, that the difference occurred by chance.  A larger standard deviation is not an indication of the magnitude of the group difference. However, it is an indicator of the probability that the difference observed may not be due to chance.

Because the values of many statistical tests are driven in part by sample

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